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How Many Solar Panels Do I Need to Power My House?

Updated: Jul 24, 2023

Are you considering installing solar panels in your home? Today, more than 2 million houses throughout the United States have solar panels, and this number is expected to grow as more and more people learn about the advantages they provide.


If you are considering installing solar panels on your house but don't know where to begin, welcome! You are in the right place. In this article, we'll explain the inner workings of solar panels and help you work out how many you will need for your home. Let's dig in, shall we?



how many solar panels does a house need


How to Determine How Many Solar Panels You Need

When installing solar, our professionals need to determine how many solar panels you need to install to get enough power to run your home. You have to ensure you get it right to avoid unnecessary inconveniences after the project. You can do this with the help of an online calculator tool or by yourself.


You must also consider the direction and configuration of the panels on the home.


Annual Electricity Usage

When going with the latter, there are a few factors you need to consider. The first step is to calculate your annual electricity usage. You can complete this calculation by looking at your past electricity bills or estimating your usage if you don't have any bills handy.


Solar Panel Wattage

Once you know your annual electricity usage, you need to check the watt ratings of the solar panels you're considering. The average solar panel produces around 200 watts of power, but this can vary depending on the brand and type of panel.


Production Ratios

Finally, you need to take into account production ratios, which are the percentage of sunlight that gets converted into energy by the solar panel. For example, a solar panel with a production ratio of 15% will only produce 15 watts of power for every 100 watts of sunlight it receives.


With all these factors considered, you can now determine how many solar panels you need to power your home.



how many solar panels is enough for a home


Formula to Determine How Many Solar Panels You Need

You may calculate the number of solar panels required to power your home by multiplying your average household hourly electricity use by the highest sunshine hours in your location and dividing the result by the panel's wattage.


For example, if you live in an area with an average of 5 peak sunlight hours per day and your household uses 9,400 kWh of electricity per year, you would need 17-42 panels to generate 11,000 kWh/year.


On average, the solar system for a home consists of 20 to 25 panels, but the number you'll need will depend on numerous factors, such as the amount of sunlight you get, the efficiency of the solar panels, and the size of your home.


What Are the Benefits of Solar Panels?

There are several benefits to installing solar panels. The most obvious is that it will save you money on your energy bills. Solar panels are an environmentally friendly energy source, so you can also feel good about doing your part to reduce your carbon footprint.


Solar panels are also very low maintenance, so once installed, you won't have to worry about them. They will provide you with a reliable energy source for years to come. As an added advantage, you can earn some money by installing solar panels in your home. You can do this by selling any extra energy produced back to the grid. You also get to enjoy tax cuts and rebates from the federal and state governments in some states.


Factors that Affect How Many Solar Panels You Will Need

Now that you know the average number of panels needed to power a home, it's time to learn about the factors that can affect your specific situation. These include the climate where you live, the angle and orientation of your roof, the amount of shade on your property, and more.


The best way to determine how many solar panels you need is to consult a professional. The experts at Devlin Energy in Boston, MA, can help you understand all the factors that will affect your situation and recommend the best solution for your needs.


We will recommend the property solar panel configuration for optimal energy efficiency.


Consider What Solar Panel Sizes You Need

The size of the solar panel is also taken into consideration when deciding how many solar panels you will need for your specific home or building.


Standard Residential Solar Panel Sizes:

  • 60-cell panels: These panels typically have dimensions around 39 x 66 inches and an average power output of 250-320 watts.

  • 72-cell panels: These larger panels have dimensions around 39 x 77 inches and an average power output of 330-450 watts.


Commercial/Utility-Scale Solar Panel Sizes:

  • 96-cell panels: These panels are larger and have dimensions around 41 x 78 inches, with a power output range of 400-600 watts or more.

  • 144-cell panels: These larger panels are commonly used for utility-scale installations and have dimensions around 41 x 104 inches, with a power output range of 500-700 watts or more.


Turn to the Professionals at Devlin Energy to Power Your Massachusetts Home

If you're interested in installing solar panels, Devlin Energy can help. We are a family-owned business with over 7,000 installs expertly completed throughout New England. We maintain partnerships with the safest and most reliable solar equipment manufacturers so that we can provide you with the perfect system for your needs.


Now that you understand the basics of solar panel installation and how to calculate the number of panels you need, it's time to get started on your project. Devlin Energy is here to help you every step of the way, from risk assessment and equipment selection to financing and installation on your New England home.


Get in touch with us today to learn more about solar panel installation in New England. We'll help you determine the best way to power your home with solar energy, so you can start saving money and protecting the environment. Get your free quote today!


Image Source:

MAXSHOT.PL/Shutterstock

Jason Finn/Shutterstock


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